Tag Archives: To the editor

93 Year Old Man Missing Since Hurricane Isaac

Antoine Edmond

Antoine Edmond

St. Charles Parish authorities have issued a reminder to the public that they are still seeking info on the whereabouts of Antoine Edmond, a 93 year-old man who was last seen on August 26, 2012, as Hurricane Isaac made its way toward the coast of Louisiana. Mr. Edmond, who lived at 274 Magnolia Ridge in Boutte, Louisiana, suffers from Alzheimer’s disease and was last seen wearing a red shirt, blue jeans, and no shoes. The St. Charles Parish Sheriff’s Office first issued a missing person report in August, but wants to remind the public that he is still unaccounted for.

Anyone with any information on Antoine Edmond is asked to contact Detective Lance Richards with the St. Charles Parish Sheriff’s Office at 985-783-6807.

Louisiana Emergency and Homeland Security Preparedness Contact Numbers

As hurricane-to-be Isaac bears down on Louisiana, some citizens may have the need for emergency information. This is a parish-by-parish list of emergency contact numbers [Source: Louisiana State Police]

Acadia Lee Hebert (337) 783-4357 (337) 788-8852 Email: lheb...@appj.org

Allen John Richer (337) 300-9032 (337) 639-4326 Email: elto...@centurytel.net

Ascension Rick Webre (225) 621-8360(225) 621-8362 Email: rwe...@apgov.us

Assumption John Boudreaux (985) 369-7351 (985) 369-7341 Email:john...@assumptionoep.com

Avoyelles Anzell Jones (318) 240-9160 (318) 240-9162 Email:aoh...@kricket.net

Beauregard Glen Mears (337)460-5442 (337)460-5460 Email: glen...@centurytel.net

Bienville Rodney Warren (318)263-2019 (318)263-7404 Email: rwar...@bienvilleparish.org

Caddo/Bossier Sandy Davis (318) 425-5351 (318) 425-5940 Email:sda...@cbohsep.org

Calcasieu Richard “Dick” Gremillion (337) 721-3800 (337) 437-3583 Email:ohs...@cppj.net

Caldwell Dale Powell (318) 649-3764 (318) 649-3765 Email: cald...@bellsouth.net

Cameron Eddie Benoit (337) 775-7048 (337) 775-7043 Email:came...@camtel.net

Catahoula Ellis Boothe (318) 744-5697 (318) 744-5697 Email:cata...@att.net

Claiborne Dennis Butcher (318) 927-3575 (318) 927-2115 Email: ooep...@bellsouth.net

Concordia Morris White (318) 757-8248 (318) 757-7200 Email: con...@bellsouth.net

DeSoto Alan Bounds (318) 872-3956 (318) 872-2304 Email: deso...@bellsouth.net

East Baton Rouge JoAnne Moreau (225) 389-2100 (225) 389-2114 Email: jmor...@brgov.com

East Carroll LeeKeitha M. Reed (318) 559-2256 (318) 559-1502 Email: ecpj...@bayou.com

East Feliciana Bud Weigand (225) 683-1014
(225) 244-5881 (225) 683-1478 Email:efoe...@bellsouth.net

Evangeline Liz Hill (337) 363-3267 (337) 363-3308 Email: vang...@centurytel.net

Franklin Mitch Reynolds (318) 435-6247 (318) 435-6258
Email: mitc...@franklinparish.org

Grant Robert Meeker (318) 627-3041 (318) 627-5927 Email: jans...@aol.com

Iberia Prescott Marshall (337) 369-4427 (337) 369-9956 Email: pmar...@iberiagov.net

Iberville Laurie Doiron (225) 687-5140 (225) 687-5146 Email: ldoi...@ibervilleparish.com

Jackson Paul Walsworth (318) 259-2361 ext 204 (318) 259-5660 Email: pwal...@jacksonparishpolicejury.org

Jefferson David Dysart (504) 349-5360 (504) 227-1315 Email:ddys...@jeffparish.net

Jefferson Davis Ivy Woods (337) 824-3850 (337) 821-2105 Email: sher...@jeffdavis.net

Lafayette William Vincent (337 291-5075 (337) 291-5080 Email: e...@lafayettela.gov

Lafourche Chris Boudreaux (985) 532-8174 (985) 532-8292 Email: chr...@lafourchegov.org

LaSalle Scott Franklin (318)992-2151 (318)992-8919 Email: sfra...@lasalleso.com

Lincoln Kip Franklin (318) 513-6202 (318) 874-3910 Email: kfra...@lincolnparish.org

Livingston Mark Harrell (225) 686-3066 (225) 686-7280 Email: lohs...@lpgov.com

Madison Earl Pinkney (318) 574-6911 (318) 874-3910
Email: earl...@yahoo.com

Morehouse James Mardis (318) 871-3907 (318) 281-4141 (318) 281-1773
Email: jmar...@mpso.net

Natchitoches Victor Jones (318) 357-7802 (318) 357-2208 Email: jper...@npsheriff.net

Orleans Jerry Sneed (504) 658-8700 (504) 658-8701 Email: NOO...@nola.gov

Ouachita Tracy Hilburn (318) 322-2641 (318) 322-7356 Email: thil...@ohsep.net

Plaquemines Guy Lagist (504) 274-2476 (225) 297-5635 Email: g...@plaqueminesparish.com

Pointe Coupee Donald Ewing (225) 694-3737 (225) 694-5408 Email: daew...@pcpso.org

Rapides Sonya Wiley (318) 445-0396 (318) 445-5605 Email: swi...@rapides911.org
Email: rapi...@suddenlinkmail.com

Red River Russell Adams (318) 932-5981 (318) 932-5802 Email: ra1...@netzero.net

Richland Dawn Blackshear (318) 728-0453 (318) 728-5888 Email: rppj...@inetsouth.com

Sabine David Davis (318) 256-2675 (318) 256-9652 Email: spo...@suddenlinkmail.com

St. Bernard John Rahaim (504) 278-4268 (504) 278-4493 Email: jrah...@sbpg.net

St. Charles Scott Whelchel (985) 783-5050 (985) 783-6375 Email: swhe...@scpeoc.org Dispatch (24 hr) Email: comm...@scpeoc.org

St. Helena Jessica Strickland (225) 222-3544 (225) 222-3696 Email: shoh...@hotmail.com St. James Eric Deroche (225) 562-2364 (225) 562-2269 Email: eric...@stjamesla.com

St. John the Baptist Jobe Boucvalt (985) 652-2222 (985) 652-2183 Email: j.bo...@sjbparish.com

St. Landry Lisa Vidrine (337) 948-7177 (337) 948-9139 Email: stla...@att.net

St. Martin Terry Guidry (337)394-3071 (337) 394-5705 Email: ohs...@stmartinsheriff.org

St. Mary Duval H. Arthur, Jr. (337) 828-4100 ext 135 (337) 828-4092 Email: dart...@stmaryparishla.gov

St. Tammany Dexter Accardo (985) 898-2359 (985) 898-3030 Email: dacc...@stpgov.org

Tangipahoa Dawson Primes (985) 748-3211 (985) 748-7050 Email: daws...@tangipahoa.org

Tensas William ‘Rick” Foster (318) 766-3992 (318) 766-4391 Email: tpo...@bellsouth.net

Terrebonne Earl Eues (985) 873-6357 (985) 850-4643 Email: eeu...@tpcg.org

Union Brian Halley (318) 368-3124 (318) 368-2728 Email: hall...@aol.com

Vermilion Rebecca Broussard (337) 898-4308 (337) 898-4309 Email: vpo...@cox-internet.com

Vernon Howard Hudgens (337) 238-0815 (337) 238-9025 Email: jhud...@vpso.org

Washington Tommy Thiebaud (985) 839-0434 (985) 839-0435 Email: tthi...@wpgov.org

Webster John Stanley (318) 846-2454 (318) 846-2446 Email: webs...@wildblue.net

West Baton Rouge Deano Moran (225) 346-1577 (225) 346-0284 Email: dean...@wbrcouncil.org

West Carroll Peggy Robinson (318) 428-8020 (318) 428-8025 Email: wcp...@bellsouth.net

West Feliciana Chief Tommy Boyett (225) 635-6428 (225) 635-6996 Email: tboy...@wfpso.org

Winn Harry Foster (318) 628-1160 (318) 727-3112 Email: winn...@winnparish.org

New Predictions: Busy Hurricane Season


This year’s Atlantic hurricane season got off to a busy start, with 6 named storms to date, and may have a busy second half, according to the updated hurricane season outlook issued today by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, a division of the National Weather Service. The updated outlook still indicates a 50 percent chance of a near-normal season, but increases the chance of an above-normal season to 35 percent and decreases the chance of a below-normal season to only 15 percent from the initial outlook issued in May.

Across the entire Atlantic Basin for the season – June 1 to November 30 – NOAA’s updated seasonal outlook projects a total (which includes the activity-to-date of tropical storms Alberto, Beryl, Debbie, Florence and hurricanes Chris and Ernesto) of:
•12 to 17 named storms (top winds of 39 mph or higher), including:
•5 to 8 hurricanes (top winds of 74 mph or higher), of which:
•2 to 3 could be major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of at least 111 mph)

The numbers are higher from the initial outlook in May, which called for 9-15 named storms, 4-8 hurricanes and 1-3 major hurricanes. Based on a 30-year average, a normal Atlantic hurricane season produces 12 named storms, six hurricanes, and three major hurricanes.

“We are increasing the likelihood of an above-normal season because storm-conducive wind patterns and warmer-than-normal sea surface temperatures are now in place in the Atlantic,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at the Climate Prediction Center. “These conditions are linked to the ongoing high activity era for Atlantic hurricanes that began in 1995. Also, strong early-season activity is generally indicative of a more active season.”

However, NOAA seasonal climate forecasters also announced that El Niño will likely develop in August or September.

“El Niño is a competing factor, because it strengthens the vertical wind shear over the Atlantic, which suppresses storm development. However, we don’t expect El Niño’s influence until later in the season,” Bell said.

“We have a long way to go until the end of the season, and we shouldn’t let our guard down,” said Laura Furgione, acting director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Hurricanes often bring dangerous inland flooding as we saw a year ago in the Northeast with Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. Even people who live hundreds of miles from the coast need to remain vigilant through the remainder of the season.”

“It is never too early to prepare for a hurricane,” said Tim Manning, FEMA’s deputy administrator for protection and national preparedness. “We are in the middle of hurricane season and now is the time to get ready. There are easy steps you can take to get yourself and your family prepared. Visit www.ready.gov to learn more.”

Are Seniors At Risk In Hurricane Season?

Are seniors at risk in hurricane season?.

General Honore’ To Speak At Civil Rights Awards Banquet

General Russell Honore'

Gen. Russell Honore'

Retired Lt. General Russel Honore’ will deliver the keynote address at the Justice Revius O. Ortique, Jr., Civil Rights Awards Banquet presented by the Louisiana Justice Institute (LJI) this Thursday, August 26, 2010, at 7pm in the University Ballroom at Xavier University.

“We are grateful that Gen. Honore’ join us to honor Civil Rights Leaders who have stood on the frontlines in the fight for social justice, and they are devoted to the protection of civil rights, said Tracie Washington, Co-Director of the LJI. “It is especially appropriate that Gen. Honore’ will be our speaker on the historic fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina,” Washington added.

2010 award nominees are: U.S. Representative Maxine Waters (D-CA), Oleta Fitzgerald (Director, Southern Regional Office-Children’s Defense Fund), Shirley Sherrod (former U.S. Dept. Of Agriculture official), Alden McDonald (Pres. & CEO-Liberty Bank and Trust Co.), Bishop Charles Jenkins (Ret., Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana), Rev. Tyronne Edwards (Zion Travelers Cooperative Center-Phoenix, Louisiana), Mary Joseph (Director, Children’s Defense Fund Louisiana Office), Atty. Bill Quigley (Center for Constitutional Rights), Jerome Smith (Treme’ Community Center), & Don Hubbard (civic and business leader), and The Katrina Citizens Leadership Corps.

General Honore’, commander of Joint Task Force Katrina, is credited with restoring order in the chaotic wake of Hurricane Katrina, and for coordinating military relief efforts for Hurricane Katrina-affected areas across the entire Gulf Coast before launching the region’s recovery from the epic disaster that followed Katrina.

A native of Pointe Coupee Parish, General Honore’ is a graduate of Southern University and earned a Master of Arts degree from Troy State University. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Public Administration from Southern University. He retired from 34 years of military service after serving with distinction in a variety of command positions in South Korea, Germany and Washington, DC, and currently resides in southeast Louisiana.

General Honore’ is the author of the highly acclaimed book, “Survival: How Being Prepared Can Keep You and Your Family Safe”.
Tickets and sponsorships are still available for event online at: www.louisianajusticeinstitute.org or by calling (504) 872-9134.

The Louisiana Justice Institute (LJI) is a nonprofit, civil rights legal advocacy organization, devoted to fostering social justice campaigns across Louisiana for communities of color and for impoverished communities.

Good Morning America Looking For Katrina Hero

Where y’at, Larry? The morning show on ABC has an APB out for a young man named Larry Thomas, who they say rescued people and saved lives in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, after the levees broke. According to Good Morning America, he even delivered a baby on a bridge. Check him out in this clip (courtesy Ochsner Medical Center “Team Katrina” DVD):

If you know Larry or have information about him, CLICK HERE to tell “GMA.”

FEMA Extends Temporary Housing Program For Hurricane Ike

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) announced today that the Governor’s request for an extension of the temporary housing unit (THU) program has been granted for eligible Hurricane Ike survivors. The program, previously extended to July 9, 2010, will now end January 7, 2011.

“While the majority of temporary housing unit occupants in this program have transitioned to more permanent, long-term housing, there are a few that need a little more time,” said State Coordinating Officer Ben Patterson. “We are confident that this second extension will help the remaining occupants of FEMA-supplied units complete their recovery.”

In response to Hurricane Ike, a total of 3,701 temporary housing units (mobile homes and park models) were provided to Texas residents. Currently 149 units remain occupied.

“The majority of our remaining occupants are working to rebuild or repair their homes” added FEMA Hurricane Ike Recovery Manager Brad Harris. “Remaining families may continue to live in the units as long as they remain eligible and can show that they are making progress toward their permanent housing.”

FEMA continues to provide eligible applicants the opportunity to purchase their temporary housing unit through a sales program. To date, 1,062 occupants have chosen to buy their unit.

FEMA will also continue to work with the state, tribal nations, local governments and voluntary organizations to facilitate donations of units that can be used for the sole purpose of providing temporary housing to eligible applicants.

Additionally, at the State of Texas’ request, FEMA has reopened the temporary rental assistance program. Applicants may be authorized to receive a one-time Temporary Housing award for two month’s rent to facilitate their transition from the FEMA-provided THU into interim housing (subject to program rules for maximum assistance). For those applicants who are moving from the THU because their home is being constructed under a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) project, the Recovery Manager may, on a case-by-case basis, authorize one additional month of rental assistance if, due to unforeseen contractor delays in repairing or reconstructing the dwelling, the applicant will have to remain out of the dwelling for more than 60 days.

Beyond Katrina

NEW ORLEANS, June 1, 2010 /PRNewswire/ — Hurricane Katrina’s deluge was Biblical. When it hit Louisiana and Mississippi the morning of August 29, 2005, the storm caused fearsome destruction. Then the disaster grew worse. The levees – the man-made walls built to protect New Orleans from the water surrounding it – failed. Their collapse flooded 80 percent of the city. By the time the waters receded and the survivors regrouped, Katrina, and then Hurricane Rita, had claimed more than 1,400 lives and the dreams of hundreds of thousands.

“Hurricane Katrina was a watershed in American history,” says historian Doug Brinkley. “Never before did we watch the near total devastation of a major American city as it happened. The response and rebuilding challenged us as a nation. New Orleans and the Gulf Coast have come back renewed. The story of what happened five years ago must be remembered.”

On October 26, 2010, the Louisiana State Museum in New Orleans will remember the devastation and showcase the renewal with a new exhibit years in the making. Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond is a $7.5 million exhibit opening on the ground floor of the historic Presbytere in the French Quarter’s Jackson Square. The 6,700 square-foot installation tells the stories of real people caught in the hurricane’s wrath. It tells of their rescue, recovery, rebuilding and renewal in a way certain to move both those who survived the storms of 2005 and those who watched the events unfold on TV.

Combining eyewitness accounts, historical context, immersive environments and in-depth scientific exploration, Katrina and Beyond enables visitors to understand the 2005 storms’ impact on Louisiana, the Gulf Coast and the nation. It is a story of how a culture – the rich, variegated world of New Orleans and coastal Louisiana – has learned to live with the fragility of its environment and how the storms of 2005 gave rise to a new vision for the region.

Designed by the Boston-based firm ExperienceDesign that worked with the Museum’s historians, curators and exhibit designers, Living with Hurricanes consists of a powerful and moving series of galleries – each telling one aspect of the story using artifacts and rich media – sound, video and computer graphics.

“Museums have become places for interactive learning,” says Museum Director Sam Rykels. “The galleries in Living with Hurricanes are designed to convey what happened to visitors of all ages and all backgrounds incorporating everything from survivors’ personal mementos to their thoughts and feelings.”

Gallery One illustrates Louisiana’s history with water, from the Mississippi River’s benefits to the threats of coastal storm surges and floods. Visitors will move through the “Evacuation Corridor,” overhearing residents’ voices as they weigh their options as Katrina approaches. A state of the art “Storm Theater” shows Katrina’s full fury with moving and dramatic footage of the hurricane’s onslaught.

Gallery Two takes visitors past a leaking floodwall and into an attic and onto a roof where they can view the flooded city surrounding them. They’ll hear a firsthand account of a St. Bernard Parish family’s rescue and view artifacts, histories and photographs.

Throughout the galleries are compelling artifacts ranging from music legend Fats Domino’s baby grand piano found in his flooded Ninth Ward house to a Coast Guard rescue basket to seats from the Louisiana Superdome. The objects serve as touchstones in recalling the days after the storm.

The forensics of Katrina unfold in Gallery Three where science and innovative displays come together. A large interactive table map shows the paths of Katrina and Rita and the sequence of floods that inundated the region. Visitors discover how the levees failed with digital animation. Additional displays illustrate the realities of eroding wetlands, disaster management, engineering and the science of predicting and tracking hurricanes.

The Fourth Gallery celebrates recovery and promotes preparedness, showcases the ingenuity of Louisianans in rebuilding their lives and communities. The gallery will be updated regularly to reflect advancements in flood protection and coastal restoration and new strategies for living with hurricanes.

“Visitors will leave knowing the power of hope,” says Louisiana Lt. Governor Scott Angelle. “Even in the darkest hours just after the storm Louisianans were already drawing up plans to make their home a better place than it was before. Now, five years after, there’s a true rebirth in our state.”

Founded in 1906 with a mission to collect, preserve, interpret and present the state’s rich history and diverse cultures, the Louisiana State Museum’s collection now totals more than 450,000 artifacts and works of art. These provide an authentic experience of Louisiana to visitors from around the world while enhancing the quality of life for residents. The Museum is part of the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism.

The exhibit will be located at The Presbytere on Jackson Square, New Orleans. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. For more information, please call 800.568.6968 or visit http://www.KatrinaAndBeyond.com

Water Still Troubled

Just a reminder that the Academy Award-nominated, Sundance Film Festival Best Documentary “Trouble The Water” was released on DVD a few weeks ago, on August 25.

This remarkable piece of work is unlike any other Katrina-themed documentary ever made, and is raw, inspiring, surrealistic, and subtly sensational, but that’s only a part of what makes it one of the best documentaries of any kind produced in recent memory. It’s so good, I watched it twice already.

Anyone connected through Hurricanes Katrina and Rita should make it a point to see this movie, if you haven’t already (apologies to Kim, Scott, Tia, Carl and even Brian for taking so long to spread the word). Register and leave your opinions below.

The DVD is on sale at most major disc outlets. It’s also available for rent or sale from New Orleans DVD at its DVD machines in Laplace and Harvey, LA. Watch the trailer here:

SOS: Save Our Schools Shingdig

Also on Saturday, May 16, 2009, from 6:00 PM – 9:30 PM the Charmaine Neville Band headlines the ‘Inaugural Shindig’ for grassroots nonprofit Save Our Schools NOLA. This “COMMUNITY CELEBRATION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS” will be held at the Federal Reserve Bank Ballroom (The Security Center), 147 Carondelet Street in New Orleans.

For more info visit sosnola.org

The Bottom Will Rise

Saturday, May 16th, 2009 from 4 – 6 pm at the Community Book Center, 2523 Bayou Road in New Orleans, the International School for Bottom Up Organizing (ISBO), a nonprofit dedicated to training organizers around the globe, will be hosting a free lecture and book signing event for their new publication, “The Bottom Will Rise and Create a New World”.

As a fundraising event, the book will be available for a donation of $15 which will go to support young organizers from countries such as Columbia, Venezuela, Mexico, and Bolivia attend the next session of the School in July of 2009.

Many of the writings in the book come from the direct experiences of bottom up organizing in New Orleans post-Katrina by the People’s Organizing Committee and the New Orleans Survivor Council.

For more info contact co-author Kim Nunez at 504 305 9653. For more information about ISBO please visit www.peoplesorganizing.org.

Road Home elevation grant

I qualified for an elevation grant from Road Home.  Likely it w

can never happen due to subdivision restrictions, by-laws

covenants.  Does anybody know if elevation grant money

must be spent on elevating the dwelling or can it be spent

on other house repairs suffered from the hurricane?

No FEMA News


As the City of New Orleans, State of Louisiana, State of Mississippi, and the rest of the Gulf Coast – still already ravaged by Hurricane Katrina three years ago – prepares to defy yet another tempest of the sea called Gustav, FEMA has issued no public media statements regarding the impending threat.

Is this just a repeat performance or a deliberate, calculated step in introducing the Gulf Coast to the new “FEMA of 2008?”

Who? Not ME!

I checked out the old Craiglist Katrina board, and I am pissed off. It seems some peeps still think ALL of us Katrina people got these big checks for $5000 or 2000 or whatever. Not true! And that’s jus ONE of the stupid things people think about us. Seems like we are outkasts in some places. Not ALL Katrina survivers are moochers and thugs!